Lacoste At the end of the 1920s, Rene Lacoste, for his own personal use, designed and had a batch of loose-knit cotton shirts made. Comfortable and completely sweat-absorbent, this shirt made it easier to bear the heat on the American courts. It was an immediate revolution for tennis players of the time, who up to then had been wearing long-sleeved traditional city shirts with warp and weft fabric. The first LACOSTE shirt was white, slightly shorter than its contemporaries, with short sleeves and a ribbed collar. Its light, loose-knit fabric represented none other than the "jersey petit pique". By teaming up with the great hosier Andre Gillier in 1933, Rene Lacoste launched the industrial production of his polo shirt marked with a crocodile and thus gave birth to the LACOSTE L.12.12 shirt; L for Lacoste, 1 to describe the fabric, petit pique cotton, 2 for the short sleeve design (for a long sleeve it would be 1312), and finally 12, the number of versions presented to Rene Lacoste. It was the first time a brand was visible on the outside of a piece of clothing. Palladium Second Level lbhsp@lacosteindia.com +91-22-43474000,

High Street Phoenix, Senapati Bapat Marg, Lower Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400013

info@highstreetphoenix.com

+91-22-43339994

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We are open on all days from 11 am to 10 pm.

High Street Phoenix

  • Lacoste
  • Lacoste
  • Lacoste
  • Lacoste

Lacoste

At the end of the 1920s, Rene Lacoste, for his own personal use, designed and had a batch of loose-knit cotton shirts made. Comfortable and completely sweat-absorbent, this shirt made it easier to bear the heat on the American courts. It was an immediate revolution for tennis players of the time, who up to then had been wearing long-sleeved traditional city shirts with warp and weft fabric. The first LACOSTE shirt was white, slightly shorter than its contemporaries, with short sleeves and a ribbed collar. Its light, loose-knit fabric represented none other than the "jersey petit pique". By teaming up with the great hosier Andre Gillier in 1933, Rene Lacoste launched the industrial production of his polo shirt marked with a crocodile and thus gave birth to the LACOSTE L.12.12 shirt; L for Lacoste, 1 to describe the fabric, petit pique cotton, 2 for the short sleeve design (for a long sleeve it would be 1312), and finally 12, the number of versions presented to Rene Lacoste. It was the first time a brand was visible on the outside of a piece of clothing.

Details

Location

Palladium Second Level

Timings

All week days - 11am to 10pm.

Contact

lbhsp@lacosteindia.com